“Up a Tree” and Vulnerable

Posted: February 10, 2014 in World On The Edge

raccoon_on_treeUp a tree.  Cornered, trapped, caught.

At another’s mercy, in another’s power.

The expression is said to come from coon hunting. Once a raccoon is treed by the hounds, he’s a gone coon.

Do you like to be up a tree, with someone else in charge? Do you like to put yourself in a vulnerable position? Generally, I don’t.

I don’t like the feeling of not being in control. I want to know how something’s going to turn out before I step into it. I like the safety of the ‘usual.’  So, taking a  risk is not a thing I’m likely to do easily–without a push, without a really good reason.

But there are some really good reasons for allowing ourselves to become vulnerable enough to take a risk. Another person’s life, for instance. We’d like to think that if someone was in danger, we’d step in to help, or even save his life, despite the risk to ourselves. We put another ahead of ourselves and this shows human love.

Love is a really good reason to make yourself vulnerable.

We cannot be truly in love with someone with out being vulnerable. We can’t walk around in armor; we have to take that off and let our true selves out in order to experience genuine love. Otherwise, it’s just a game of charade.

In love, we often have to back down, or give way.  We cannot force those we say we love to do much of anything–ok maybe a little child, but even then, it’s not a good idea.

When we become vulnerable and let go—make ourselves completely available to  the  other—the love between us  becomes stronger.  We allow the other the freedom to find for themselves his/her way forward, even if it involves mistakes.  Even if those mistakes affect us, too.

When we allow ourselves to be ‘treed…’

When we  loosen our grip on the wheel and let go of  every little thing…

When we allow ourselves to be vulnerable to someone we love, and they do likewise…

Then love becomes extremely powerful. Powerful enough to withstand any threat or risk.

This is selflessness— not selfishness.

This is when our hearts are open, and our very lives are on the line.

This is genuine love. And there is nothing else quite like it.

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