Archive for August, 2018

Life itself is a terrible wrestling match between divine love and human freedom. And God is not insured of a victory–not even from some of our own, especially some of our own clergy. Right now, human freedom seems to have the upper hand.

We are in troubled times where lies are being twisted to resemble Truth. And if one disagrees with the promoted agendas, there is an attempt to make him or her feel guilty by holding up false platitudes resembling Catholicism, but not true to it. Instead, a finger is pointed at faithful Catholics, insinuating that disagreement with the falsities  shows racism, sexism, no charity, lots of judging, and more. This is difficult for many faithful Catholics to hear, watch, or personally experience from others who question what the church has taught for well over two thousand years about the sanctity of marriage, the evil of abortion, the disorders of homosexuality, and the fact that a man is created to be a man and a woman is created to be a woman. But disorder is where evil works best. Confuse and then condemn.

Always we must remember:  Our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world-rulers of this darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places. —Ephesians 6:12.  For despite the condemning labels, we are indeed wrestling for the truths God intended us to follow. 

We don’t want to admit that some who speak as authorities concerning the Church we love are as vulnerable to evil as anyone else. Yet, we should not be surprised. The very mission of evil is to seek and destroy Truth in any way, and in any place, it can — especially in the Catholic Church whose doctrine crushes its ugly head. We must have courage to vigorously stand up for the Truths of our Church. We cannot be vicious in our battles though; we recognize that we have often been sinful, too.

The Church is made up of individual people, and each of us, at one time or another, is also a target of evil, and sometimes even a participant. My goodness, how many times do we personally open the door for evil in our own lives? We know  first-hand the sins we have and how easy it is to cover them over with lies or excuses, and then twist circumstances to make our sins seem okay. We don’t want to be the ones who are wrong, so we change the ‘wrong” to “right.’  Our human freedom allows us to do this.

But we also know that we have the strength of God within us, and that we are called to admit our sins and confess them in sorrow, expecting God’s forgiveness which He gives.

We know as well, that a person is an individual being, one in itself and distinct from all other beings. No two people are exactly the same, just as no two flowers or no two stars in the sky are exactly the same. Our sameness–the thing that makes each of us a human person is that we are both body and soulwe have a physical nature and a spiritual nature. And just as our human bodies are fallible to human failures, our spiritual natures are also fallible, for they are influenced by our personal histories–as unique as the flowers and the stars– and by our own free decisions.

And yet, there are times–this is one of them–when we must not let our fallibilities frighten us. Neither must we be afraid of being labeled. We must polish up our spiritual armor, tattered as it may be, and stand together in TRUTH.  We are more than God’s hands and feet on Earth. Indeed, we are His army. His soldiers. And soldiers are brave; they do not run from battle. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. — Ephesians 6:11

We are the Body of Christ–the genuine Body of Christ–sent out as lambs among wolves.

In fact, Jesus sends us out with battle instructions: If any place will not welcome you or listen to you, leave that place and shake the dust off your feet as a testimony against them.–Mark 6:11

In Matthew: 27-28, Jesus gives us confidence in the voice of the Holy Spirit within us.  What I tell you in the dark, speak in the daylight; what is whispered in your ear, proclaim from the roofs. Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul.

We have been allowed to live in this moment of history. We cannot ignore that we have a role to play in today’s world. A role to defend TRUTH. And we will play it.

We are Catholic, after all.

Of course, we are supposed to help take care of our fellow-man. If he is hungry, we must give him food. But a few weeks back, I read a blog post that seemed to say God’s intention of giving us the Eucharist was an example of how we should feed the hungry. This is not correct. The Holy Eucharist is between the individual receiver and God. The celebration of The Holy Eucharist at Mass is Jesus’s real sacrifice of His own body and blood, food for our spiritual salvation. It is a miracle, uniquely personal to each of us, and nourishes God’s own divine life in we who receive it. It is not a reenactment of feeding the hungry five thousand.  In fact, the Eucharist is not a reenactment at all. It is a covenant between each one of us and Jesus Christ who is truly present in the host, still loving us enough to offer His life for us.

As a man must be born before he can begin to lead his physical life, so he must be born to lead a Divine Life. That birth occurs in the Sacrament of Baptism. To survive, he must be nourished by Divine Life; that is done in the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. – Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

John 6: 24-35

When the crowd saw that neither Jesus nor his disciples were there,
they themselves got into boats
and came to Capernaum looking for Jesus.
And when they found him across the sea they said to him,
“Rabbi, when did you get here?”
Jesus answered them and said,
“Amen, amen, I say to you,
you are looking for me not because you saw signs
but because you ate the loaves and were filled.
Do not work for food that perishes
but for the food that endures for eternal life,
which the Son of Man will give you.
For on him the Father, God, has set his seal.”
So they said to him,
“What can we do to accomplish the works of God?”
Jesus answered and said to them,
“This is the work of God, that you believe in the one he sent.”
So they said to him, “What sign can you do, that we may see and believe in you? What can you do? Our ancestors ate manna in the desert, as it is written: He gave them bread from heaven to eat.”
So Jesus said to them,
“Amen, amen, I say to you, it was not Moses who gave the bread from heaven; my Father gives you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is that which comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.
“So they said to him, “Sir, give us this bread always.”
Jesus said to them,
“I am the bread of life;
whoever comes to me will never hunger,
and whoever believes in me will never thirst.

United with the angels and saints of the heavenly Church, let us adore the most Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist. Prostrate, we adore this great mystery that contains God’s new and definitive covenant with humankind in Christ. — Pope John Paul II

Prayer Before Reception of The Eucharist:

Latin: Domine, non sum dignus, ut intres sub tectum meum:
sed tantum dic verbo, et sanabitur anima mea.

English: Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof,
but only say the word and my soul shall be healed.

PANGE LINGUA by St. Thomas Aquinas: