Archive for May, 2015

By HenriqBastos, 2014, MorgueFile.com

By HenriqBastos, 2014, MorgueFile.com

For the lady involved, one of the first rules of Ballroom dancing is:  Let your partner lead.

Oh, is that hard to do for me! I like to be in control. I like to be in charge. I think it comes from having been the mother of five, as well as a business owner for a good portion of my life.

But I’ve come to see that always being in control does not always work.

A few years back, I was in charge of driving one of my daughters to college at Belmont Abbey in North Carolina.  I had to drive through Atlanta, always a fearful drive to me.  In addition, two of my younger children were with me, making noise, causing so much confusion that I had trouble following the signs. I ordered them to behave. I ordered them to be quiet. Oh yes, I yelled out all the consequences they would face!

Then, in the busy traffic, I approached an overhead aqueduct with a scrawl of words in black paint: JESUS IS IN CONTROL.  How happy I was for that reminder!

Because Jesus is in control.

We don’t need to lead.  He will do it.

All we need to do is relax in His arms.

With no more yelling, I made it through Atlanta. I made it to the college.

I’ve made it through much more difficult situations over the years.

I’ve made it with the help of Jesus, the controlling partner in the dance of my life..

Waves and Mirrors

Posted: May 28, 2015 in World On The Edge

file5451238436403I spent my childhood summers on Panama City Beach, Florida at a cottage my grandfather built for my grandmother , a surprise for their twenty-fifth anniversary. The beach was something very familiar, the Easter Basket colors of its water–lime green, purple, cobalt blue. Its sand white as sugar, its dunes barely able to be climbed by a young child, and challenging to the point of necessity for a pre-teen. But the most impressive characteristic of the beach were the waves.

A wave can startle. A wave can hit you in the face. And unless you’re careful, a wave can bring you down.

Isn’t life like that, too?

Don’t we often have wave after wave of surprises, disappointments, and even devastations in life?

But when we make the right judgments, the same waves that bring these things also bring delight, laughter, and that refreshing past-time–fun.

There are scientific principals that effect the waves on a beach, make them less or more.

There are principled and unprincipled people who effect the waves in our life as well, making it more or less.

Who are those people in our lives ?

On a beach, there are some wonderful waves we’d play in, and some violent waves we wouldn’t go near for fear of danger.

In life there are some wonderful people who care deeply for us, and there are some whose lies we fall for time after time. Shouldn’t we discriminate between the two? Shouldn’t we consider the dangers, or benefits of each?

All this concerns what we’re actually after, what we’re really looking for in our lives. We can pretend we’re seeking Truth, but unless we really try to discover and accept what Truth actually is, we’re hypocrites.

The Truth is that there are some people who can help us along, who will walk with us if we let them–people who mirror the image of God in which we are made. And there are people who pretend to be our best friend, but who actually who mirror the Father of Lies.

Which of these should we turn to? Which of these should we walk with? Which of these should we trust during our journey toward eternal life?

 By quicksandala, 2015, MOrgueFile.com


By quicksandala, 2015, MOrgueFile.com

Science tells us that humans appeared on Earth over 200,000 years ago. Can you imagine how many human beings have come and gone in that time?

The older we get, the more we hear it: Life is Short.
And of course, it is. So, why do we think we’re so important when we’re ‘here today and gone tomorrow?’

Who are we anyway?? And why should anyone care whether we’re here or not?

Karl Rahner  (March 5, 1904 – March 30, 1984), was a  German Jesuit priest and theologian, is considered one of the most influential Catholic theologians of the 20th century.  According to Rahner, all things in the world come from the one same origin, God; so there is  “an inner similarity and commonality,” most clearly disclosed in a human being. A person is the unity of spirit and matter, and only in a human person can spirit and matter can be experienced in their real essence and in their unity. That spirit represents the unique mode of existence of a single person–when a person makes himself accessible to it. And it is always oriented towards the incomprehensible Mystery called God.

In other words, we are here because of God–and for God.

And what would he have us do?

“Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?”

Jesus replied: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself. All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.” –Matthew 22:36-40

Blessed Louis and Zelie Martin

Blessed Louis and Zelie Martin

Twice now, I’ve addressed The Daughters of Mary at St. Ignatius Church in Mobile, Alabama. This group of beautiful women, founded by my longtime friend, Deborah Madonia, is special.  Their purpose is a renewal of faith and family. Believe me–they do it well!

This post, about the first married couple to be proposed for canonization, is written by Mary Ann McConnell, one of the members of The Daughters of Mary, and was sent out in a newsletter to its members. I think it’s wonderful, very interesting, and I know you will, too. So, here it is. Thank you, Mary Ann!

….     …..     …..     …..     …..

Zelie and Louis Martin: These are the parents of St. Therese of Lisieux or St. Therese of the Little Flower of Jesus. This couple were the first parents of a saint to be beatified and the first married couple to be proposed for canonization. The canonization should take place during the world synod of bishops on the family in October 2015. I was amazed when I heard Father announce this in church a few weeks ago. My thoughts were “They raised a saint and now they are going to be canonized saints too!” What role models for us! Isn’t that what we want to do – raise our children to be holy – but to be saints? Wow! What did they do? I wanted to know.

I researched the web and one article stated, “They were not saintly because they raised a saint; they raised a saint because they were saintly.” What do married saints look or act like?

Both Zelie Guerin and Louis Martin came from prosperous French families. They each were masters of crafts: Zelie was a maker of point d’Alencon lace and started her own business. Louis learned clock making and eventually opened his own watch-making and jewelry business. As each were growing up they were blessed with a strong faith. Each hoped to become a religious and had very close relationships with religious but this was not to be. Zelie and Louis met in Alencon and were married in 1858. Each of their businesses prospered and attained financial stability. Within the next 15 years had nine children – 2 Boys and 7 girls. Zelie wrote; “We lived for them, they were all our happiness.” Within three years the two baby boys, a five year old girl and and a six-and-a half week old infant girl died. Zelie and Louis were numb with sadness but their faith sustained them through these tragedies. Their last daughter was born weak and frail. They feared she too would die but she survived the illness and became strong. This was daughter was Marie Francois Therese later know as St. Therese of the Little Flower.

Zelie died of breast cancer in 1877 at the age of 45, when Therese was only 4 years old and leaving Louis to raise their 5 daughters. The first 3 daughters entered the convent before Louis’ death in 1894 and the other 2 joined after his death. So the question of qualities of saintliness do Zelie and Louis Martin possess? Fr. Antonio Sangalli, vice-postulator of the cause for canonization of the Martins, on the significance of their lives, miracles and canonization states “They give witness that the conjugal and marital experience is not an obstacle to holiness, but rather that two spouses who love each other can become saints….

The example they show us today is: The Martin family have faced all under God’s gaze, placing Jesus Christ in the first place of every situation, both of joy and anguish, always certain of this great embrace of the Lord and with His help they would be able to do anything and overcome any difficulty. Bishop O’Toole stated, “Life came at them unexpectedly, just as it comes at us. Their genius lay in how they accepted what happened to them.” In her autobiography, Therese conveyed the goodness of her parents and the sense of prayerfulness and care for others which was instilled in her home. She wrote God gave me a father and mother more worthy of Heaven than of earth.

Pope Francis has a special devotion to St. Therese. The pope used to keep a photo of her on his library shelf when he was archbishop of Buenos Aires. He has said that when he has a problem, he asks St. Therese “not to solve it, but to take it in her hands and help me accept it.” As a sign that she’s heard his request, he said, “I almost always receive a white rose.”

May God bless you,

Mary Ann McConnell

The following is a video by my friend, Fr. James Kubicki, Apostleship of Prayer

 By TheBrassGlass, 2014, MorgueFile.com


By TheBrassGlass, 2014, MorgueFile.com

A couple of years ago, I posted a blog about war in the Middle East. Since then, our government may have brought soldiers home, but in the process lost the country/countries that many of our soldiers died to free. A big, short-sighted mistake.

And now, looking at cities in civil unrest like St. Louis, Baltimore, and others, it looks as if we are at war in our own country, with our own countrymen. Americans are killing other Americans.

Are we paying attention??

The danger of not paying attention, or caring about what happens enough to put a stop to it, is HUGE.

We need to see, and remember.

I recently saw a video where a large percentage of Pennsylvania college students couldn’t even answer questions about The Holocaust of World War II. Some didn’t even know who Adolf Hitler was, or what country he led in the War. They’d never even heard of Concentration Camps, and certainly couldn’t name one! Some students in another questionnaire thought George Washington was president during the Civil War. And if you can believe it, another thought the American Revolution was fought against Spain!

What’s happened to once-required American History classes? If they are taught at all, they are sometimes revised to favor the politically correct. These are things that should be remembered, and remembered correctly.

If we don’t study our past, and the generation involved in a particular war dies off, so do the memories and the lessons learned. The past should have been considered in the wars and holocausts that are happening today. Yes, today!

Today, we ought to be considering the courage, of our American soldiers who fought in past wars, as well as the loss and grief of their families. But how many really do that?

However, there is one past war that is, at least, remembered by many Southerners. No matter the side your ancestors may have fought on in the tragic Civil War, Americans actually killed other Americans on their own soil. They suffered the same feelings of fear, and sorrow as soldiers experience today. But the devastation left in the South in order to bring it to its knees was abominable. Think of the burning of Atlanta, and Sherman’s march to the sea, destroying all in his path–including the farms and homes and livestock and possessions of my own relatives. Oh, did they have stories to pass down to us!!

I think this video is a good example of what war really is, an intensely personal tragedy. This goes for past wars, and war in the Middle East today.

 By TheBrassGlass, 2014, MorgueFile.com


By TheBrassGlass, 2014, MorgueFile.com

A couple of years ago, I posted a blog about war in the Middle East. Since then, our government may have brought soldiers home, but in the process lost the country/countries that many of our soldiers died to free. A big, short-sighted mistake.

And now, looking at cities in civil unrest like St. Louis, Baltimore, and others, it looks as if we are at war in our own country, with our own countrymen. Americans are killing other Americans.

Are we paying attention??

The danger of not paying attention, or caring about what happens enough to put a stop to it, is HUGE.

We need to see, and remember.

I recently saw a video where a large percentage of Pennsylvania college students couldn’t even answer questions about The Holocaust of World War II. Some didn’t even know who Adolf Hitler was, or what country he led in the War. They’d never even heard of Concentration Camps, and certainly couldn’t name one! Some students in another questionnaire thought George Washington was president during the Civil War. And if you can believe it, another thought the American Revolution was fought against Spain!

What’s happened to once-required American History classes? If they are taught at all, they are sometimes revised to favor the politically correct. These are things that should be remembered, and remembered correctly.

If we don’t study our past, and the generation involved in a particular war dies off, so do the memories and the lessons learned. The past should have been considered in the wars and holocausts that are happening today. Yes, today!

Today, we ought to be considering the courage, of our American soldiers who fought in past wars, as well as the loss and grief of their families. But how many really do that?

However, there is one past war that is, at least, remembered by many Southerners. No matter the side your ancestors may have fought on in the tragic Civil War, Americans actually killed other Americans on their own soil. They suffered the same feelings of fear, and sorrow as soldiers experience today. But the devastation left in the South in order to bring it to its knees was abominable. Think of the burning of Atlanta, and Sherman’s march to the sea, destroying all in his path–including the farms and homes and livestock and possessions of my own relatives. Oh, did they have stories to pass down to us!!

I think this video is a good example of what war really is, an intensely personal tragedy. This goes for past wars, and war in the Middle East today.

Requiem……

Posted: May 22, 2015 in World On The Edge
By Pippalou, 2015, MorgueFile.ocm

By Pippalou, 2015, MorgueFile.ocm

I am going to a funeral today, a Mass of Christian Burial. I am going to celebrate a life lived in a marriage that lasted over seven decades.

I am going to share in the rhythm of Mass, its recitation of prayers and rituals that echo back through the years to a little white church made of bricks, much smaller, much closer than today.

I am going with memories sliding through my thoughts like the moon passing behind the branches of pines.

I am going to a burial ground that is sacred, a spot where those who have gone before us, marked with the sign of faith, await resurrection.

I am going to a hill where I’ll step near my own parents, grandparents, other relatives and friends.

I am going to the inevitable closing of life on earth to the opening of life everlasting.

I am going to a funeral today.

Be at rest once more, O my soul,

for the LORD has been good to you.

— Psalm 116:7