The Restorers

Posted: July 10, 2013 in World On The Edge

You know them. You’ve probably welcomed them into in your home: the painters, floorers, plumbers, electricians—all those who help to keep up the house in which you live.

Some of us try to do these tasks ourselves, and some of us know better than to try.  So, we call in the Restorers. Because we want order. Because we want things to work as they were made to work–and because we know what happens if we let it all go.

When the refrigerator goes out, the food goes bad. When the toilets stop up, the bathroom floods, and maybe even ruins the floors. When sparks come from an electrical socket,  fire is a definite possibility. No one can deny that these  problems need attention. No one can deny that to ignore them is foolhardy, even irresponsible. We must use our heads and solve the problem in our house.

But don’t we have another house for which We The People are responsible? And don’t we call her The United States of America? It’s my opinion, she’s in a problematic, even deadlocked, situation, especially when it comes to our ever-degrading culture. Many feel this deeply, and are attempting to right the wrongs. But most of us only comment and move on to something more pleasurable. We are not Restorers. Instead, we are letting our cultural problems go without doing much to fix them. In fact, some even believe our Country’s too far gone to fix at all. I don’t share that opinion.

When my children were little and complaining about a problem and how they couldn’t fix it. I usually sang them a few verses from the following children’s song about using commonsense. It’s a bit long, but I’m going to post it because I think it makes a good point about those who are problem-solvers, and those who are not.

You’ll see the progression: Henry’s whining about all the reasons why fixing his problem with the bucket can’t be done, while Liza offers suggestion after suggestion as to how it can be done.

There’s a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There’s a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

Then mend it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then mend it, dear Henry, dear Henry, mend it.

 

With what shall I mend it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I mend it, dear Liza, with what?

With a straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With a straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, with a straw.

 

The straw is too long, dear Liza, dear Liza,

The straw is too long, dear Liza, too long,

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, cut it.

 

With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, with what?

With a knife, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With a knife, dear Henry, dear Henry, with an knife.

 

The knife is too dull, dear Liza, dear Liza,

The knife is too dull, dear Liza, too dull.

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, sharpen it.

 

On what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

On what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, on what?

On a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

On a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, a stone.

 

The stone is too dry, dear Liza, dear Liza,

The stone is too dry, dear Liza, too dry.

Well wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Well wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, wet it.

 

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, with what?

Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, water.

 

In what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

In what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, in what?

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, a bucket.

 

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

Use your head, then! dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Use your head, then! dear Henry, dear Henry, use your head!

Let’s be Restorers, not only of our own households, but Restorers of the America we love. Let’s use our heads.

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